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Icon to celebrate the good news about Farscape. It's not an icon I am terribly fond of but the only other one I have is of John looking sad. It's my favourite icon (apart from Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor in dresses) but John is sad and this is happy news.

* * *

Despite the ranting, GWB's visit has turned into something of an anti-climactic event. The Resist Bush Tea Party sounded like fun and the main demo is today but there was little trouble. Touch wood, it will remain that way. GWB gave a rather good speech at the Banqueting Hall in which he outlined an international ethos I could live with. If the actions were to match the rhetoric, it would be a start.

I recommend Timothy Garton Ash's article in today's Grauniad. Comment section. For a counterblast, look for Michael Gove in The Times.

It's 4.30am and I can't seem to sleep. That's bad because I have to leave for work in six hours. Oy. (Speaking of which, the critic application crashed and burned but at least I didn't chicken out.)

Most of the people I know well at work are going on the demo. Them being them, they're going to the pub first. A fair few are going to work afterwards. The rest will probably go back to the pub.

No excitement for London later today, please.

It's a measure of how well GWB's visit is going that the papers have been full of Michael Jackson and the ever-mutating swirl of allegation and rumour, and the rather fabulous story of the journalist who infiltrated the palace as a footman to discover such gems of national importance as the discovery that the Queen reads the Racing Post of a morning, the royals have tupperware dishes on their table and Prince Andrew greets the footman who is sent to wake him with the words "fuck off" and fills his apartment full of teddy bears.

* * *

The NE will not be on the demo, though it's undoubtedly something he would like to do, because he is flying to Australia for the weekend. Leaving later today, back at work on Tuesday.

His friend has a spare ticket for the Rugby World Cup Final and he said he always regretted not going to the Olympics, so he's going to see England bottle it at the final hurdle (may they prove me wrong by not choking against the fearsome Australians).

The NE -- who is a sports fanatic, from football to cricket to rugby to retuning the TVs at work so he can watch baseball -- dreamed of seeing a final, so he just said "bollocks" and booked the flight.

Of course, it's costing him a thousand quid, but still, isn't that the most wonderful example of carpe diem?

* * *

In further proof of the theory that I will buy any old crap if it promises to have a music list in it, I have bought Q's 1001 Best Songs Ever. Disappointingly, for the anal retentive among us, it doesn't seem to count down from 1001-1, but instead meanders through several top 10s and focuses on a few songs such as Penny Lane, Walk This Way and Rock Your Body

Needless to say, I love this magazine with the fire of a thousand suns, despite its faults.

As I know there are some music geeks on this list :::waving to Lilydale, Musesfool, Thassalia and the other great journallers who wax eloquent about music, much to my delight:::, here are the 10 songs that end the list:



River Deep, Mountain High Ike & Tina Turner
Possibly the best thing Tina Turner ever recorded (well, aside from that Thunderdome thing *g*), it's a dizzying slab of pop put together by Phil Spector, perhaps the ultimate expression of his "wall of sound". Its failure to make a dent in the US charts led Spector into virtual retirement. It's the musical expression of euphoria for me, anyway. And Ike was excluded from the studio for the whole time.

Live Forever Oasis
Oasis may be sad caricatures of the defiantly stupid rock monster these days, but this was the real McCoy, all brittle defiance and soaring guitars. It reminds me of being young and thinking I could take the world by the scruff of the neck.

Independent Women Destiny's Child
Picture the scene. Friday night, the toilets at any club across the land. Three women in front of the mirrors, adjusting their lippy, patting a fourth on the shoulder and saying "Don't cry, he isn't worth it... oh, go on then, let it all out." Suddenly they hear the chunky chords announcing this "I Will Survive" for the oughties. Little Ms Sob wipes the mascara dribbles from her cheeks, pulls her strappy top straight and totters out into the discolit night to dance around her handbag in defiance of bastards who chat up blondes in front of her. She is an Independent Woman, goddammit.

Result -- Insta-catharsis! Destiny's Child 1; dastardly chaps, nil

Creep Radiohead
So very much not my favourite Radiohead song, probably because it's one of those anthems that only really means something at a certain age.

15, probably.

My Name Is Eminem
Unfortunately yes, he's big and he's clever. I'll never buy any of his records but this one makes me smile.

In The Ghetto Elvis Presley
This is about as subtle as a fried banana sandwich but somehow Elvis makes it work. This and Suspicious Minds are the two great late Elvis songs.

A Day In The Life The Beatles
I can remember the first time I ever heard this. I would have been about seven years old and we were in assembly at school. I went to a Church of England village school, which meant that assembly was usually a bible story and a hymn and some kind of homily on being nice to one another and not throwing stones at the ducks. But at some point in the late 70s, there was a sudden wave of what I can only describe as "grooviness", with all the waffle-brained, flare-wearing, "we mean it, man" earnestness that implies. (Maybe they were afraid of punk). Anyway, they started trying to instill in us a love of music, playing Pavane for a Dead Princess, On Hearing The First Cuckoo In Spring and La Mer

Then one day, they played A Day In The Life. It starts mesmerically, with Lennon's surreal rhymes, swaps into jauntiness with Macca's middle section, then there's that astonishing crescendo of noise, leading up to an almighty bang, like the creation of a new world and the sustaining chord the peace that follows it. No one fidgeted. Then we went off and wrote poems about holes.

I went home and asked my mother about hearing it again but she replied that she didn't have Sgt Pepper because The Beatles had got silly after 1966 *g*

Smells Like Teen Spirit Nirvana
I love this record. It's become cliche, and I still love it. Even if it does rip off Boston's More Than A Feeling

I Say A Little Prayer Aretha Franklin
This starts brilliantly. "The moment I wake up, before I put on my make-up, I say a little prayer for you..." It's simple, just someone going through their day. You never quite know what's coming until that chorus begins its sublime ascent...

And it's Aretha. I mean come *on*

And finally...

One U2
The Edge has some wonderful things to say about this, which may be U2's best song. Certainly one of their darkest. I flip between liking this, I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For and Kite best of all U2's songs. Johnny Cash's version is a thing of beauty. But I'm going to leave you with The Edge:

On one level it's a bitter, twisted vitriolic conversation between two people who've been through some nasty, heavy stuff: "We hurt each other/ Then We Do It Again". But on another level there's the idea that "We get to carry each other". "Get to" is the key. The original lyric was "we have to carry each other" and it was never quite right … but "get to" … it's like it's our privilege to carry one another. It puts everything into perspective, introduces that idea of grace … The honesty of it helps -- the bare-knuckled telling-it-like-it-is-ness

* * *

So. Give me a number from 11-1001 … let us speak of music

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Comments

( 29 comments — Leave a comment )
mamahippierwc
Nov. 19th, 2003 10:17 pm (UTC)
I pick 913
I agree that Tina would be in my top 10 (I would be partial to Proud Mary) and River Deep is a classic. I also admit it would not be a top ten without Elvis, The Beatles or Aretha (I thought it was Dionne Warwick who sang Say a Little Prayer did she cover it and Aretha did the original) but Respect is her ultimate song. Nirvanna I can get behind and even Eminem (although I am gay and should hate him I must admit I do like his music and respect his artistry) but I don't know about Destiny's Child. I am the king of chic music however and do like them. So I say 913 that's the number I pick.
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 02:51 am (UTC)
Re: I pick 913
When I was growing up we always listened to the Dionne Warwick version; I never knew that Aretha did it until I got one of those Aretha 'best ofs'.

Paul MacCartney picks Proud Mary as one of his top five singles, though not the Tina Turner version (which is the one I like best)

913 is "The Great Beyond" by REM. A good choice. At first I thought it might be Nickelback, but it turned out that that was 917
fourteenlines
Nov. 19th, 2003 10:27 pm (UTC)
Suspicious Minds = best Elvis Presley song EVER. Even though he's old and fat when he's singing it. But it's a song with a true craft to it; it's got a very distinctive sound and the lyrics have some subtlety. And the harmonies - oh God, the harmonies!

A Day in the Life is...mesmerizing. I think I like "Eleanor Rigby" better, but it's also a lot shorter. They're both very intense songs in their own way - ADitL with the epic, melodramatic way it meanders from haunting to discordant to staccato, the long lazy it way it tells a story, and with more than just words. And, "I read the news today, oh boy"/"blew his mind out in a car" are still some of the best song lyrics ever written. But Eleanor Rigby has those violins and the harmonies that get under your skin and the sudden way it stops and starts.

The Beatles were awfully silly on Magical Mystery Tour, of course. If by "silly" you mean "higher than Timothy Leary." But even MMT had "Penny Lane" and "Strawberry Fields Forever."

And U2. One. Guh. (Again, special fondness for "With or Without You" and "Bullet the Blue Sky," but. But.) Bono's voice on "Love is a temple, love the higher law..." I don't think anything has ever been more perfect.
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 02:56 am (UTC)
Suspicious Minds = best Elvis Presley song EVER. Even though he's old and fat when he's singing it. But it's a song with a true craft to it; it's got a very distinctive sound and the lyrics have some subtlety. And the harmonies - oh God, the harmonies!

Yes. I mean, it's really hard to ruin Suspicious Minds anyway, it's kind of singer-proof, but that shouldn't take away from how fabulous Elvis's version is.

A Day in the Life is...mesmerizing. I think I like "Eleanor Rigby" better, but it's also a lot shorter. They're both very intense songs in their own way - ADitL with the epic, melodramatic way it meanders from haunting to discordant to staccato, the long lazy it way it tells a story, and with more than just words. And, "I read the news today, oh boy"/"blew his mind out in a car" are still some of the best song lyrics ever written.

It's not my favourite either, but it's the most gobsmacking thing the Beatles ever recorded.

MMT... hmmmm. Great album, flawed movie [/Mulder]
ropo
Nov. 19th, 2003 10:30 pm (UTC)
(Speaking of which, the critic application crashed and burned. Not enough contacts, not enough cuts. Oh well, at least I didn't chicken out.)

I'm glad to hear you went for it, anyway! Go K!!

(Also, I think somewhere in "Independent Woman-Destiny's Child you forgot to close an italics in your code. *g*)
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 02:52 am (UTC)
(Also, I think somewhere in "Independent Woman-Destiny's Child you forgot to close an italics in your code. *g*)

Grah. Fixed.

Your icon is very groovy
coffeeandink
Nov. 20th, 2003 06:08 am (UTC)
I am sorry about the tv critic job, but glad you applied.
leadensky
Nov. 20th, 2003 07:26 am (UTC)
oh, goody, song lists!
Bummer about the job. Now, what are you applying for next?

It appears the protest hype greatly exceeded the reality. My god, we can't believe *anything* we read in the papers.

Music...

10)Well, Johnny Cash's cover of Hurt (which the SV crowd has recently discovered, and I saw the last ten minutes where they actually played the song, and I approve) is a damn. powerful. song.

9)Tina's done some stellar things - I think I'd pick Nutbrush City for the music and the joy in the lyrics.

9a)Aretha Franklin I can't choose from. Ever. Just punch up any one, I'll sit and hum along.

8) Alan Jackson's done some powerful things over the years, but Tall Tall Trees (a cover of an old George Jones tune) is bouncy and joyful and just plain silly.

7) Clint Black did Sail Right Out of Colorado and Killing Time, both interesting, reflective tunes. Never Liked the Rain might be my favorite, though.

6) U2. Guh. Still Haven't Found, for my money. Or the entirety of Achung Baby.

(On a slightly fannish note, in the X-Men comic where Jean Grey married Scott Summers, they had the band Cats Laughing play, and the song was U2's One. Which I did not care for at all. Using it for the Summers wedding, I mean.)

5) I've got a collection of celtic music that includes And There Were Roses, a heart wrenching story of north Ireland.

4) Concrete Blonde's album Bloodletting was another example of a collection of strong songs. Joey is a favorite, mostly because of the sadness that doesn't tip over the edge into out right misery.

3) Bruce Springsteen's Secret Garden - really, just about anything he's done, but this one and Glory Days are favorites.

2) A little known group called My Friend Steve did a song called What the Schooling's For - about the lessons one learns growing up.

1) Emmlou Harris, Allison Kraus, and someone I can't remember doing an old African American song Ain't Leaving Nuthin' But The Baby on the Oh Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack. And pretty much anything off that soundtrack. And anything off the Come Down the Mountain collection, too.
leadensky
Nov. 20th, 2003 08:56 am (UTC)
Re: oh, goody, song lists!
*re-reads your post*

Oh. An offical song list. Someone else's song list. *Not* a call for more 'top ten' songs. Definately not a call for *my* top ten.

Damn...not all about me again. Hate that.

Ummm. Consider the previous comment a request to check and see if any of the songs I named made the list. Please. If you feel like it.

- hg
lenadances
Nov. 20th, 2003 11:16 am (UTC)
Re: oh, goody, song lists!
I liked the list! I may soon make my own, if I can stop dealing with membership numbers. I have odd tastes, but Johnny Cash is definitely making an appearance.
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 04:30 pm (UTC)
Re: oh, goody, song lists!
No, no I *loved* your list. All comments welcome, always.
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 04:55 pm (UTC)
Re: oh, goody, song lists!
10)Well, Johnny Cash's cover of Hurt (which the SV crowd has recently discovered, and I saw the last ten minutes where they actually played the song, and I approve) is a damn. powerful. song.

I'm still trying to download Smallville so I will take your word for it , but Johnny Cash has four songs in the top 1001: Folsom Prison Blues, I Walk the Line, San Quentin and Won't Back Down

Never heard of Alan Jackson, never knowingly heard Clint Black. Country was, until recently, a minor taste here. It's growing now, partly because of the love of alt-country among 30-somethings

(On a slightly fannish note, in the X-Men comic where Jean Grey married Scott Summers, they had the band Cats Laughing play, and the song was U2's One. Which I did not care for at all. Using it for the Summers wedding, I mean.)

In the mag, The Edge mocks the idea of having One for a wedding because it's so twisted and unhappy. Talk about a co-dependent love.

5) I've got a collection of celtic music that includes And There Were Roses, a heart wrenching story of north Ireland.

Oh! You must go to Cara Dillon's site and listen to her version of "And There Were Roses" (You used to be able to get it for free). While you're there, look for "He's Young But He's Growing", which is wonderful.

1) Emmlou Harris, Allison Kraus, and someone I can't remember doing an old African American song Ain't Leaving Nuthin' But The Baby on the Oh Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack. And pretty much anything off that soundtrack. And anything off the Come Down the Mountain collection, too.

Yes! Have you ever seen the documentary series "Lost Highway"? That has a whole programme about bluegrass and how its recent resurgence came about.
lilydale
Nov. 20th, 2003 07:37 am (UTC)
Of course, it's costing him a thousand quid, but still, isn't that the most wonderful example of carpe diem?

I love that story. (Which I suspect you would have guessed in approximately zero seconds.)

Q's 1001 Best Songs Ever

Music! A huge (mangled) numbered list! I will have to get that edition of Q when it's available by me in about eight timely months.

Give me a number from 11-1001 … let us speak of music

Hit me with 73.
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 05:01 pm (UTC)
and... :::whispers::: they have *statistics* at the back. It's a geek's paradise. *g*

73. Dude! Good choice! < g >

Bob Dylan, Like A Rolling Stone

"The sneeriest sneer in rock history ladles opprobrium upon those he sees as superficial fools patronising and diluting the revolutionary ideals of the 60s. The wit is devastating, the anger heartfelt and the guitar is like a dagger to the brain
Fact Dylan claims the song is a compressed version of a short story he wrote about a young aristocratic girl living rough on the streets.
File with There but for Fortune, Phil Ochs
Allison, Elvis Costello."

angstville
Nov. 20th, 2003 07:52 am (UTC)
I'm glad that you applied for the critic's job...the whole thing about going for it and all that.

How high is Springsteen on the list and which song?

What is Number 88?
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 05:16 pm (UTC)
There are two Springsteen tracks, Born to Run at 920 and Thunder Road at 230, but it's not really in any sort of definitive order.

Number 88 is a goody but probably not one you've heard: Just A Little Bit by Liberty X, which is in the top 10 best pop songs of this decade so far list.

It'll probably be covered by one of the American Idol stars soon (though it is emphatically not a Clay sort of song), because Liberty X have something to do with the evil Simon Fuller, whose representative on Earth is Simon Cowell.
se_parsons
Nov. 20th, 2003 08:59 am (UTC)
I would like to know where these songs are on the list (if they appear):

1) Won’t Get Fooled Again by the Who

Not only is this a blatantly political song, it also kicks ass as rock ‘n’ roll. And who can’t love Roger’s screaming. He has the best, most musical, scream in rock ‘n’ roll.

2) The Times, They Are A’ Changin’ by Bob Dylan

This is an incredibly important song here in America for anyone who remembers the ‘60s. But I wonder how it fares on the Q list.

3) Purple Haze by Jimmie Hendrix

Duh.

4) For What It’s Worth by Buffalo Springfield

Again, political and important over here.

5) Kashmir by Led Zeppelin

How many people have conceived children to this song? I shudder to imagine.

6) Comfortably Numb by Pink Floyd

This is such a staple on "classic rock" radio here. And the Wall is a huge achievement. How I adore Roger Waters. Must go home and listen to "The Final Cut" in honor of Bush’s visit to England. All our British pals should listen to this album again to revisit their hatred of Thatcher. Esp. "Fletcher Memorial Home" (for incurable tyrants and kings) and, of course, "The Gunner’s Dream."

7) Rock the Casbah by the Clash

I want to know where the Clash fits in. A punk band that could actually play.

8) Sweet Home Alabama by Lynyrd Skynrd

This is such a defining song for so many people here in the US. Did it make the list? I cracked up when I saw them rapping to it in "8 Mile" because you can’t live in a trailer park in Michigan and not hear it CONSTANTLY. I do wonder how many people who love this song know about Skynrd’s anti-gun song "Saturday Night Special." "It ain’t good for nothin’, but to put a man six feet in a hole."

9) Boys Don’t Cry by the Cure

Did the Cure make the list?

10) It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll by the Rolling Stones

An anthem, man.

My random number pick 133.




infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 05:30 pm (UTC)
It aint really in order...
Checking the stats like a good geek I see that...

(1) Won't Get Fooled Again is on the list, as are Anyway Anyhow Anywhere and My Generation. Pictures of Lily is in the "top 10 humorous songs" list

(2) No. 73

(3) No! All Along the Watchtower, Voodoo Child and Crosstown Traffic but no Purple Haze. Weirdness

(4) No 791

(5) Again, no. Immigrant Song, Rock n Roll, Stairway to Heaven and Whole Lotta Love.

How many people have conceived children to this song? I shudder to imagine.

Shhhh. I don't want to imagine

(6) Nope. Three others though.

(7) Nope, because Rock The Casbah is too pop for the Q crowd. (White Man) in Hammersmith Palais, Should I Stay or Should I Go? I Fought The Law, London Calling, White Riot

(8) Yup, and Freebird

(9) Boys Don't Cry, Pictures of You, Close To Me

(10) No. And that one did surprise me. Sympathy for the Devil, Satisfaction, Under My Thumb, Wild Horses, Jumpin' Jack Flash, Tumbling Dice, and lo, the greatest Stones track of them all *evah*, Gimme Shelter

(133) This falls in the middle of the alt-country top 10, so it's Searchlight by Giant Sand. Which I've never heard, so I can't tell you anything about it and the write up is totally uninformative.
(Deleted comment)
se_parsons
Nov. 20th, 2003 09:15 am (UTC)
The Ash article is fantastic, and I think dead on accurate.

The right-wingers in this country view internationalist policy as "weak". It's part of why they hate Clinton.

Democrats mostly embrace such policies and we really are battling for the hearts and minds of the American people on this issue. America has always tended toward isolationism. The rest of the world can come to us and we'll just hang out here and be rich and they all want to be like us - which is stupid in the case of other democracies, particularly in Europe. (Now, we keep hearing, they hate us because we're better.) It's the same thing. It's a battle we really need to win if we want a world that works together cooperatively for the benefit of ALL the world's people to ever have a chance of happening.

It's respect for people's differences, or contempt. On both sides. Because Europeans tend to dog us for our backwardness and provicialism, when they have a lot of the same kinds of things going on in their own countries in regards to immigrant issues, racism, urban poverty, etc. But somehow we're the example. Odd, that. But it's easier to point fingers across the Atlantic at THOSE GUYS than at ourselves. The current demonizing of the French, who act JUST LIKE US, is a fine example. (And I love the assholes who go on and on about the superiority of our government vs. France when we ripped them off blind and then they ripped us off back and our two systems (particularly legal, thanks Napoleon) are so close to one another that you can hardly tell where the ideas came from.)

Europe has an advantage of being all jammed close together to people who speak different languages and have different cultures and realizing, after so many hundreds of wars, that you really have to work together if you want to achieve any lasting progress. We are HUGE and have no one nearby who doesn't speak our language or share our culture (Mexico doesn't count), so we think we can go it alone vs. the rest of the world. It's a dumb opinion. But most Americans have it.

And we've got to educate them about things like, why it's good to not pollute the world. And why it's good to work cooperatively with other countries.

Lots of people here think that what happens over there doesn't affect us.

It's a real problem.

thassalia
Nov. 20th, 2003 11:20 am (UTC)
Mmm. Prettiness of Farscape, all tinged in purpley blue. It is a happy icon. Although the sad John icon also makes me absurdly happy:)

I have nothing constructive to say on GWB. As my English boss said, "What, he's still alive then?" The radio here has been filled with commentators saying that just because the British don't like this administration doesn't make them anti-American. They're vehement about that statement:)

And music. You could, you know, talk solely about music, and while I'd miss the clever and witty commentary on everything else, I could also lean happily on my bent elbow and read.

Creep - absolutely the anthem of the 15 year old. (And I still love it, and play it loudly in the car, but not as loudly as I play Fake Plastic Trees).

A Day in the Life is gobsmacking. It's not my favorite Beatles song, but it never fails to make me catch my breath, wince against it and want to make things better. Should they play A Day in the Life next to The Times They Are A Changing, I'd join the revolution again.

And One. Yeah. It's perfect U2, perfect Bono. Clean, and clear, and everyone says, yes, oh, yes, that's right when he says "Get to carry each other."

So what is number 168? And please, please tell me that there is Bob Dylan on that list.
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 05:38 pm (UTC)
I have nothing constructive to say on GWB. As my English boss said, "What, he's still alive then?" The radio here has been filled with commentators saying that just because the British don't like this administration doesn't make them anti-American. They're vehement about that statement

Yes, well there was the Grauniad poll a couple of days ago that emphasised that point but it was such a silly poll ("Do you believe that America is a force for good or a force for evil?" Force for evil? Dubya isn't Darth Vader for Pete's sake. Bad poll! No biscuit!) that I wasn't sure if anyone would take it seriously.

Creep - absolutely the anthem of the 15 year old. (And I still love it, and play it loudly in the car, but not as loudly as I play Fake Plastic Trees).

I like Creep but I love things like "Black Star" and "Lucky" and "Fake Plastic Trees". At the moment I sing "How to Disappear Completely" a lot at work ... "I'm not heee-eeeere, this isn't happening" *g*

Much Dylan. Q has the big love for Dylan. Six tracks.

(168) is in the middle of the "top 10 tracks used in advertising", shoehorned between "Lovely Head" by Gold frapp and "the Battle: Speed" by The Neptunes, and it's "Run On" by Moby

I'd listen to you talk about music in a heartbeat too...
thassalia
Nov. 21st, 2003 09:58 am (UTC)
Hee hee. Being a force for evil just emphasizes my theory that we're living in a really bad TV movie:) But maybe we could all send Bush little Darth Vader helmets:)

Hmmm. While American ad agencies seem to have a serious hard on for Moby, there is sadly very little Gold Frapp. And yeah for Bob representin'. Okay, I just cracked myself up.
corianderstem
Nov. 20th, 2003 12:20 pm (UTC)
Ooh, whee, yay, fun! I need to start buying "Q" more often. It's such a fun magazine, if expensive over here.

U2's "One." Ah, yes. I not only love the song, but the video. Not the rarely-seen one with the buffalos, not the one with Bono's dad and the band in drag, all done in lovely sepia tones by Anton Corbijn, but the lip-synching, Bono's in the bar with some babe version. Because Monsieur Bono is way too fucking beautiful in it.

When he "sings," You say ..." and then stops lip-synching for the "love is a temple" bit, and just stares into the camera with those lovely blue eyes .... oh.

Oh, I'm sorry. We were talking about actual songs. *g*
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 20th, 2003 05:48 pm (UTC)
Never seen the video. It made a bit of an impression on you *g*

Eight songs by U2 on the list. *Eight*
leiliaxf
Nov. 20th, 2003 06:41 pm (UTC)
Prince Andrew greets the footman who is sent to wake him with the words "fuck off" and fills his apartment full of teddy bears.

OMG--this is me. 'Cept for the part about being a guy and having a footman, but still---totally me.

suzanne_laura
Nov. 21st, 2003 08:49 am (UTC)
Icon love
I'm just sending you this shallow note to say I reeeeaaallllly enjoyed your Colin:sigh:Icon that I saw on DE's thread. Will now go wipe drool from corner of mouth.
infinitemonkeys
Nov. 21st, 2003 12:33 pm (UTC)
Thank you
You know, you're welcome to take it for your LJ if you want it. I like making icons far more than I like actually using them.
suzanne_laura
Nov. 21st, 2003 01:05 pm (UTC)
Re: Thank you
Thanks - That's very generous of you!

I'm continually amazed by the time & imagination people put into creating thier icons. And that one was partcularly lovely!
( 29 comments — Leave a comment )

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