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(1) The news made me cry today. That seldom happens but the pictures from Beslan were so awful. It's hard not to think that it's giving ideas to terrorist scum.

(2) I went to see The Terminal today. God, what a lousy film that is. It's based on a true story, of a man who lived at Charles De Gaulle for 10 years -- a fascinating idea, and yet the script is cliche-infested and over-sentimental and the direction is surprisingly hamfisted for Spielberg (though his brown-yellow palette is gorgeous). Catherine Zeta-Jones is only ever interesting when she is playing someone who is morally ambiguous and pleased about it. In The Terminal she is just wooden.

The Terminal is pants.

(3) I am watching David Copperfield, which is notable for the first performance of wee Daniel Radcliffe, who is young David Copperfield. He's opposite Maggie Smith, who is Betsey Trotwood, which is most confusing. I keep expecting them to start discussing muggles or for one of them to turn into a cat.

I love the BBC's adaptations of Dickens. Not only are they almost all wonderful, they're sort of comforting as well, because they remind me of being a nipper. I can heartily recommend Our Mutual Friend, which is full of death and misery in the most wonderful way. Apparently Andrew Davies, he of 'Darcy dives into a lake' fame, is now adapting Bleak House. Good grief.

David Copperfield is not remotely pants.

(4) (a) I work near a pub called The Betsey Trotwood, which is an adorable name for a pub. Alas, it is not an adorable pub. If you're ever in Clerkenwell, I recommend instead The Three Kings, which *is* adorable, sells Thai food at lunchtime and boasts occasional sightings of David Thewlis, looking scruffy.

(b) In other celeb news, I know where smackhead Pete from The Libertines lives, via someone at work. I'm told he's a very funny, kind and eccentric man, apart from that pesky crack habit.

(5) London is in the grip of the most wonderful late summer heatwave. I'm going on a picnic up Stokie way tomorrow with S and J and people from work and their many offspring. I don't think I want to go but I feel I should.

(6) I feel as melancholy as a late Abba record.

(7) This past week has cured me of any desire to write about politics. Hoo-bloody-rah. Though I will note that Someone on The Daily Star managed to let the sentence about David Blunkett "seeing another woman" through three editions of the paper.

Knowing the ways of Fleet Street as I do, I strongly suspect that all the subs had buggered off to their favourite scabrous haunt and were drinking themselves to death.

[for those of you unfamiliar with UK politics, David Blunkett, the Home Secretary, is blind. It has also been alleged that he is indulging in some extra-curricular bedroom athletics with Kimberly Fortier, the married publisher of The Spectator, a journal somewhat hostile to the government in which he is a key player.]

(8) I hear that uneven is bad.

Comments

( 12 comments — Leave a comment )
ropo
Sep. 3rd, 2004 06:49 pm (UTC)
I agree about #2. It just wasn't nearly as good as I wanted it to be. I wasn't that excited about seeing it, but hey, Spielberg, Hanks, so I figured why not. And it was just blah.
infinitemonkeys
Sep. 5th, 2004 07:46 am (UTC)
I felt as though Spielberg used all his usual clues to tell me that this story was twinkly and heart-warming, but I felt coerced into having my heart warmed rather than cajoled into it. When the music was all soaring and Viktor was emerging from great swathes of lemony light and everyone was telling me what a great guy he was, I just wanted to roll my eyes.

Which is a long way of saying "what you said"
sharinlilbit
Sep. 3rd, 2004 06:59 pm (UTC)
[for those of you unfamiliar with UK politics, David Blunkett, the Home Secretary, is blind. It has also been alleged that he is indulging in some extra-curricular bedroom athletics with Kimberly Fortier, the married publisher of The Spectator, a journal somewhat hostile to the government in which he is a key player.]

He's blind...maybe he thinks she's somebody else?

Okay, that was bad.

(8) I hear that uneven is bad.

See, this is why you're my favorite. ;)
infinitemonkeys
Sep. 5th, 2004 07:47 am (UTC)
He's blind...maybe he thinks she's somebody else?
Okay, that was bad.


But it made me laugh *g*
violetisblue
Sep. 3rd, 2004 07:37 pm (UTC)
I'm quite inordinately fond of the BBC Bleak House (the one with Denholm Elliot and Diana Rigg) myself.
infinitemonkeys
Sep. 5th, 2004 07:52 am (UTC)
Good grief ,yes, but they've never repeated it in all the years I've had a video recorder, and I've never seen it on DVD. Like Fortunes of War it remains mysteriously absent from the shelves of HMV and amazon.co.uk
lilydale
Sep. 4th, 2004 06:55 am (UTC)
2. Pants indeed! I'm glad that I'm not the only person who thought so. We're so smart. ;-)

5. Where is up Stokie way?

6. As long as you're not dressing like Abba in any period, you're doing fine.

8. Hey, all numbers good!
infinitemonkeys
Sep. 5th, 2004 07:54 am (UTC)
.5 Where is up Stokie way?

Stoke Newington. North London

6. As long as you're not dressing like Abba in any period, you're doing fine.

Perhaps Agnetha's agoraphobic 1990s large T-shirt period.

8. Hey, all numbers good!

Not for me *g*
timesink
Sep. 4th, 2004 07:07 am (UTC)
It's hard not to think that it's giving ideas to terrorist scum.

They probably got the idea from fucking Columbine. {grimaces}

I just read the most horrible story -- the fuckers forced a mother into a Sophie's choice. Luckily, the child she left behind (a six-year-old girl) survived, but holy God. The psychological damage done to that entire family. Unimaginable.

Fuckers.
infinitemonkeys
Sep. 5th, 2004 07:55 am (UTC)
I just read the most horrible story -- the fuckers forced a mother into a Sophie's choice. Luckily, the child she left behind (a six-year-old girl) survived, but holy God. The psychological damage done to that entire family. Unimaginable.


God yes, the more I hear, the worse it gets. Very glad I've been off work for the whole thing
thinkum
Sep. 4th, 2004 08:52 am (UTC)
The news made me cry today. That seldom happens but the pictures from Beslan were so awful. It's hard not to think that it's giving ideas to terrorist scum.

There was a horrifying paucity of coverage here in the States (the Washington Post had a spot-on editorial, "A World-Stopping Moment Lost in the News Buzz"). God forbid we should stray from covering the ludicrous antics of the presidential election campaign.

Your comment resonates with some of the thoughts I had as I read another Post article on the subject:
The Kremlin kept tight controls on information during the crisis, failing to give accurate counts of the hostages, confirm the demands made by the hostage takers or describe the identity of the guerrillas.

When the battle began, Russian networks did not broadcast live for more than half an hour. When they went on the air, they avoided reporting any information except from official sources, which later proved inaccurate. Within three hours, all three Russian networks had dropped the story to return to regularly scheduled entertainment programs.
Where should the line be drawn, between granting publicity to the terrorists, and acknowledging the horror of such crimes against humanity? I've been wrestling with this question for a while; so far, I'm the one that's wound up pinned on the mat.

Surely the best we can do is something more than tears -- but tears seem to be all that come.
infinitemonkeys
Sep. 5th, 2004 08:04 am (UTC)
Where should the line be drawn, between granting publicity to the terrorists, and acknowledging the horror of such crimes against humanity? I've been wrestling with this question for a while; so far, I'm the one that's wound up pinned on the mat.


That's a question that better minds than mine have grappled with. I was reading this morning that in Russia there's been a virtual news blackout on the constant fighting in Chechnya, and the wave of terrorist attacks this past fortnight -- two aeroplanes brought down, a car bombing and now Beslan, are a means of getting attention as well as a means of expressing rage and trying to force the Kremlin's hand.

I don't know if that is true but tactic certainly has the world's attention now.

I tend to think that more information from multiple sources is better than less but I doubt we're ever going to know the truth about Beslan, just as we still don't know what the gas was that killed scores when the special forces ended the Moscow theatre siege.

Surely the best we can do is something more than tears -- but tears seem to be all that come.

We, as in us, personally? We can't do anything. One of the worst parts of modern living is to know of these tragedies and know that there is almost nothing we can do about them.
( 12 comments — Leave a comment )